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Tuesday, October 17, 2017

C2 - HW

1.  Read C2S1 p. 42
2. C2S1; vocabulary, Physical Setting
p. 44, RC, BQ, pp. 42-44 only

3. Energy Bonus Project
4. Science Article #1 - Energy


Monday, October 16, 2017

*** Energy Bonus Project ***

*** Energy Bonus Project ***

1. You are going to complete a Science Project/Demo/Experiment at home.

2. Use the Scientific Method, like we use in class, as a guide for your project.
a. Title
b. Problem
c. Hypothesis
d. Materials
e. Procedure
f. Results (Graph your results!)
g. Analysis (Independent Variable, Dependent Variable, Constants)
h. Conclusion

3. Do your project on a display board, power point, or google slides.

4. Include pictures of your project and pictures of yourself working on it.

5. This is a solo project; we will work on other projects with partners in the future.

I suggest using the following website:

New Website!!! https://brightside.me/article/six-simple-science-experiments-you-need-to-show-your-kids-14605/  <-------

http://www.energyquest.ca.gov/projects/index.html

Here are some additional websites to find projects:
 http://www.sciencebuddies.org/science-fair-projects/recommender_interest_area.php?ia=Energy&d=all&p=1

http://www.pinterest.com/stevespangler/fall-halloween-science/

http://kidsactivitiesblog.com/60117/halloween-home-science

http://chemistry.about.com/od/halloweenchemistry/a/halloweensci.htm

http://www.sciencebob.com/blog/?p=360

http://www.babble.com/crafts-activities/spooky-science-10-experiments-for-halloween/


If you need any help, please come to room 508 after school. 

**Due Date 10/30/17**

- Mr.Considine

Lab # 2 – Crazy Coasters and the Exploration of Potential vs. Kinetic Energy

Lab # 2 – Crazy Coasters and the Exploration of Potential vs. Kinetic Energy

Introduction
Who likes roller coasters?  I do! The purpose of the coaster's initial ascent is to build up its potential energy. The concept of potential energy, often referred to as energy of position, is very simple: As the coaster gets higher in the air, gravity can pull it down a greater distance. You experience this phenomenon all the time: think about riding your bike or pulling your sled to the top of a big hill. The potential energy you build going up the hill can be released as kinetic energy -- the energy of motion that takes you down the hill.
  
Problem   
How does height affect the energy on an object?

Hypothesis   

I hypothesize that if _________________________________________________________________________________


then, __________________________________________________________________________________________________

because __________________________________________


Materials
Foam pipe insulation
Glass marble
Ruler
Tape
Triple beam balance

Procedure
  1. Construct your crazy coaster track using the materials provided.
  2. Measure the length of track and record your data into your Results.
  3. Lay the track on the ground and make a loop with 1/3 of the length; the loop should be ~ 24-30 cm in diameter.  Tape the loop to the side of the track to keep its shape.
  4. Take turns trying to get the marble to complete the loop successfully; a marble that does not complete the loop or jumps the track is unsuccessful.  Record your data in the table below and make any additional observations on its energy. 
  5. Using a balance, weigh the mass of the marble and enter it below.
  
Additional Data

Mass of marble = ___ grams
Length of track = ___ cm
Loop diameter = ___ cm

Results  

Starting height (m)
Successful loop completion by marble – 3 trials (Y/N)
Additional observations about the marble's "energy" – three sentences, one for each observation
0.25
1.
2.
3. 
1.
2.
3.
0.50
1.
2.
3.
1.
2.
3.
0.75
1.
2.
3.
1.
2.
3.
1.00
1.
2.
3.
1.
2.
3.
1.25
1.
2.
3.
1.
2.
3.
1.50
1.
2.
3.
1.
2.
3.
1.75
1.
2.
3.
1.
2.
3.
2.00
1.
2.
3.
1.
2.
3.




 Analysis

1.        At what heights were you able to successfully complete the loop?


2.        Why didn’t the marble complete the loop at lower positions?  At higher positions?


3.        How does height affect potential energy?


4.        Where on the crazy coaster was the marble’s potential energy  at its lowest?  Its highest?  Draw a picture and label these positions.


5.        A.  Describe the energy the marble would have at a starting height of 0.0 m. 
B.  Calculate the PE of your marble at a starting height = 0.0 m. (603, 602, 623)

6.        Starting height minimum for successful loop = ____ cm
7.       Starting height maximum for successful loop = ____ cm
8.        Calculate the marble’s Potential Energy (P.E.), at each position, using the following equation: Potential Energy = (mass)(gravity)(height)
P.E. = mgh
 (note: gravity ~ 10 m/s2(603, 602, 623) 
9. Graph your data.  X- axis: Starting Height; Y- axis: Potential Energy (603, 602, 623)

Conclusion
What was your problem?
 Restate your hypothesis.  Was your hypothesis right or wrong?  What facts would support this?
 What did you learn in this lab?
 What did you like about this lab?
 What were some challenges you had to deal with?
 What could you do next with this problem?  What other tests could you perform?
 Write down any other additional thoughts, observations, inferences, etc.








Tuesday, October 10, 2017

1. Go to ---> https://jr.brainpop.com/science/beascientist/scientificmethod/
login: password:
a. Put on the Closed Captions (CC) and play the movie.
b. Take the Easy Quiz and record your score.
c. Word Play, Play with words! Choose a word to explore. Draw or write about it. 

2. Go to ---> https://www.flocabulary.com/unit/scientific-method/
Join a Class --->
Watch the video on "slowest" speed.
Click on Vocab.

Friday, October 6, 2017

Scientific Theory vs Scientific Law

What is the difference between a scientific theory and a scientific law?   Einstein and Newton will help you understand!


When: Friday, 10/6/17
Where: Science Notebook

Wednesday, October 4, 2017

C1 HW

HW: Chapter 1

1. HW: C1S1
1.Read pp. 6-7, 9-11
2.Reading Check Q/A
3. p. 7 Analysis, Inquiry, Design Q/A
4. Self Check Q/A #1-5
5. Vocabulary

2. C1.S2 pp. 12-20 vocabulary, blue questions, reading check,
self check Q/A #1,2;
Mini-Lab p. 14; Applying Math p. 17

3.   Text p. 35 -Visualizing Main Ideas
4. pp. 36-37 Ch. 1 Review #1-3,5,6,9-11,13-18, 21, 23, 25, 28

Friday, September 29, 2017

Lab #1: The Sphere Rolling Down the Ramp Into the Plastic Truncated Cone

Lab #1: The Sphere Rolling Down the Ramp Into the Plastic Truncated Cone


Problem:
How does the mass of a sphere affect how far it can move a cup?


Hypothesis:
I hypothesize that if _________________________________________________________________________________


then, __________________________________________________________________________________________________

because _______________________________________________________________________________________________





Materials:
  • ramp placemat
  • plastic cup with “door” cut out and 5.0g mass on top
  • grooved ruler
  • A variety of spheres (golf, ping pong, marble, high bounce)
  • wooden block
  • masking tape
  • triple beam balance


Procedure: (Written in numbered steps)
  1. Set up ruler so that the “0.0cm” end of it lines up with the line on the placemat that says “End of Ramp/Ruler.”  Use tape to keep it in place.
  2. Place the block at the opposite end of the ruler.  Line the edge of the block with the “30.0cm” mark and secure it with tape.  
  3. Place the plastic container with the 5g mass on top in the starting circle so that the door is open to the end of the ramp.  
  4. Release the golf ball from the 20.0cm mark on the ruler.
  5. Record how far the cup is moved in the “20.0cm release point” data table.  
  6. Repeat steps 4 and 5 three times with each ball recording the data each time.  
  7. Find the average of the three trials and record it in the corresponding data table.  


Variables:
Independent

Dependent

Constants



Data: Units of mass = grams (g)
Mass of the cup: ____________________
Mass of the golf ball : ___________________

Mass of the ping pong ball: __________________


Results

Data Table 1: Distance the ball pushes the plastic cup when dropped from 20.0cm
BALL
Trial 1
Trial 2
Trial 3
Average
Golf




Ping Pong
















Data Table 2: Distance the ball pushes the plastic cup when dropped from 30.0cm

BALL
Trial 1
Trial 2
Trial 3
Average
Golf






















Data Table 3: Distance the ball pushes the plastic cup when dropped from 10.0cm

BALL
Trial 1
Trial 2
Trial 3
Average
Golf




Ping pong


















Data Table showing the distance a golf ball moves a plastic cup at three different starting heights


Golf Ball starting heights
Distance the cup moves 1
Distance the cup moves 2
Distance the cup moves 3
Average
10 cm




           20 cm




            30 cm











Analysis:

1. Which ball made the cup travel the farthest at 20.0cm release point?  What property about the ball causes the difference?





2. Which ball made the cup travel the least at 20.0cm release point?  Why do you think it performed this way?





3. Did those balls perform in a similar manner at the 10.0cm and 30.0cm release points? Why or why not?




4. Predict what you think would happen if we performed the same experiment with a tennis ball, and explain why you would predict this.




5. Construct a bar graph showing your results.  Use the following information to assist you with the graph: x-axis - various spheres, y-axis - distance the cup moved (cm), title - bar graph comparing how two different masses affect the distance a cup moves after they have collided.

Conclusion
 What was your problem?
 Restate your hypothesis.  Was it right? wrong?   How did your data support or not support your hypothesis? YOU MUST REFER TO YOUR DATA (AVERAGE DISTANCES) TO GET CREDIT FOR THIS QUESTION.

Briefly describe your procedure.
 What did you learn in this lab?
 What did you like about this lab?
 What were some challenges you had to deal with?
What might be some sources of error in this lab?
 What could you do next with this problem?  What other tests could you perform?
 Write down any other additional thoughts, observations, inferences, etc.